Temporomandibular disorders in patients with inherited coagulation disorders: A clinical study


Yenel S., Çankal D. A., Kayali S., Akarslan Z., Çulha V., Kaya Z.

Journal of Stomatology, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, vol.123, no.4, pp.473-477, 2022 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 123 Issue: 4
  • Publication Date: 2022
  • Doi Number: 10.1016/j.jormas.2021.10.005
  • Journal Name: Journal of Stomatology, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus, EMBASE, MEDLINE
  • Page Numbers: pp.473-477
  • Keywords: Temporomandibular disorders, Hemophilia, Coagulation disorders
  • Gazi University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

© 2021 Elsevier Masson SASIntroduction: One of the most common problems in patients with inherited coagulation disorders, especially hemophilia, is joint problems. This study aims to investigate whether temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is affected in patients with hemophilia or other coagulation factor disorders. Material & methods: In this study, a patient group and a control group were formed. The patient group consisted of 44 individuals with hemophilia or other coagulation disorders (von Willebrand disease and rare factor deficiencies) and the control group consisted of 45 healthy individuals. In both groups, TMJ health was evaluated through a questionnaire and clinical examination. Results: The prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) that we evaluated was higher in the patient group than in the healthy individuals. Pain in the jaw, temple, in the ear or in front of the ear; pain in the jaw, temple, ear or front of the ear by opening the mouth or moving the jaw forward/sideways; closed locking (subjective); jaw joint noises (subjective) and TMJ noises during open & close movements on the right side in clinical examination were statistically significantly higher in the patient group than in the control group. Discussion: There are very limited studies on temporomandibular joint health in patients with coagulation factor deficiency. In this study, it was observed that patients with inherited coagulation disorders, especially hemophilia, were more likely to develop TMD than healthy individuals. This situation was thought to be due to the increased susceptibility to TMJ bleeding in patients with coagulation factor deficiency.