Mediterranean versus Atlantic Monk parakeets: towards a differentiate management at the European Scale?


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Jose Luis P., Strubbe D., Ancıllotto L., Frank D., Latsoudıs P., Menchettı M., ...More

11th European Vertebrate Pest Management Conference, Warszawa, Poland, 25 - 29 September 2017, pp.50-51

  • Publication Type: Conference Paper / Summary Text
  • City: Warszawa
  • Country: Poland
  • Page Numbers: pp.50-51

Abstract

The Monk parakeet Myiopsitta morıachus is an invasive species vvidely distributed across the world. Its invasive populations have been reported from several European countries, but data on population sizes and trends are few and often outdated. From 2015 to 2017, we have conducted a census across Europe to update Monk parakeet population sizes and analyze, vvhenever possible, their growth trends. Results show than in some countries commonly cited as invaded by Monk parakeets, such as Germany or Czech Republic, the species is actually not present. Furthermore, some countries where few data were available before our census, were revealed to harbor large parakeet populations. For example, the monk parakeet population in Greece turned out to be not only Europe’s third largest, but also the one with the highest growth rate ever registered in Europe. Mediterranean populations typically are larger than Atlantic ones, grovving exponentially and shovving signs of fast rang The Monk parakeet Myiopsitta morıachus is an invasive species vvidely distributed across the world. Its invasive populations have been reported from several European countries, but data on population sizes and trends are few and often outdated. From 2015 to 2017, we have conducted a census across Europe to update Monk parakeet population sizes and analyze, vvhenever possible, their growth trends. Results show than in some countries commonly cited as invaded by Monk parakeets, such as Germany or Czech Republic, the species is actually not present. Furthermore, some countries where few data were available before our census, were revealed to harbor large parakeet populations. For example, the monk parakeet population in Greece turned out to be not only Europe’s third largest, but also the one with the highest growth rate ever registered in Europe. Mediterranean populations typically are larger than Atlantic ones, grovving exponentially and shovving signs of fast rang