A homozygous missense variant in the WRN gene segregating in a family with progressive pulmonary failure with recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax and interstitial lung disease


Sezer A., KAYHAN G., RAMASLI GÜRSOY T., ŞİŞMANLAR EYÜBOĞLU T., PERÇİN F. E.

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF MEDICAL GENETICS PART A, 2022 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Publication Date: 2022
  • Doi Number: 10.1002/ajmg.a.62986
  • Journal Name: AMERICAN JOURNAL OF MEDICAL GENETICS PART A
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus, Applied Science & Technology Source, BIOSIS, CAB Abstracts, EMBASE, MEDLINE
  • Keywords: interstitial lung disease, pneumothorax, pulmonary failure, SFXN5, Werner syndrome, WRN, WERNER-SYNDROME, SPECTRUM, DNA
  • Gazi University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a condition affecting the lung parenchyma by inflammation and fibrosis and can be caused by various exposures, connective tissue diseases (CTD), and genetic disorders. In this report, a family with five patients having progressive respiratory failure that begins with coughing in adolescence, followed by dyspnea and recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax, and death in early adulthood is presented. The patients were diagnosed to have ILD through clinical and radiological evaluations. Molecular genetic analyses of the family provided two homozygous rare variants in the WRN and SFXN5 genes, co-segregating with the phenotype. The network analyses pointed out that the variant in the WRN, rather than that in the SFXN5 gene, could be the main factor in the existence of the ILD phenotype, putatively through the altered DNA repair and telomere maintenance pathways. In silico analyses suggested that the variant could affect the exonuclease activity or the stability of the WRN protein. Moreover, the adolescent-onset pulmonary phenotype described in the case has not been reported in Werner Syndrome, the only disease known to be associated with biallelic WRN pathogenic variants. Thus, the present phenotype could be either a very atypical presentation of Werner syndrome or a new clinical entity associated with the WRN gene.