Womanliness as Masquerade: Tracing Luce Irigaray's Theory in Angela Carter's Nights at the Circus


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Suembuel Y.

TARIH KULTUR VE SANAT ARASTIRMALARI DERGISI-JOURNAL OF HISTORY CULTURE AND ART RESEARCH, cilt.4, sa.2, ss.71-79, 2015 (ESCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier

  • Yayın Türü: Makale / Tam Makale
  • Cilt numarası: 4 Konu: 2
  • Basım Tarihi: 2015
  • Doi Numarası: 10.7596/taksad.v4i2.434
  • Dergi Adı: TARIH KULTUR VE SANAT ARASTIRMALARI DERGISI-JOURNAL OF HISTORY CULTURE AND ART RESEARCH
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.71-79

Özet

Published in 1977 with a great deal of controversy within European feminist circles, Luce Irigaray's This Sex Which Is Not One presents the author's commentary on the modern phallocentric culture, commodification of women and their counteraction disguised within the very patriarchal structures. Irigaray, for instance, views womanliness and female submissiveness as a strategy that women have always made use of in order to develop a much more unfettered self behind such masks. Women masquerade as objects to be consumed to achieve a freer voice from the patriarchal discourse and to establish themselves as the ultimate subjects of a never-ending cultural exchange.