The Predictive Role of Happiness, Social Support, and Future Time Orientation in Career Adaptability


Öztemel K., Yıldız Akyol E.

Journal of Career Development, vol.48, no.3, pp.199-212, 2021 (SSCI) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 48 Issue: 3
  • Publication Date: 2021
  • Doi Number: 10.1177/0894845319840437
  • Journal Name: Journal of Career Development
  • Journal Indexes: Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI), Scopus, ABI/INFORM, Business Source Elite, Business Source Premier, EBSCO Education Source, Education Abstracts, Educational research abstracts (ERA), ERIC (Education Resources Information Center), Psycinfo
  • Page Numbers: pp.199-212
  • Keywords: career adaptability, happiness, perceived social support, future time orientation, MULTIDIMENSIONAL SCALE, LIFE SATISFACTION, PERSPECTIVE, MATURITY, YOUNG, QUESTIONNAIRE, CONSEQUENCES, CONSTRUCTION, RELIABILITY, VARIABLES
  • Gazi University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

© Curators of the University of Missouri 2019.In the 21st century, young adult people who are prepared for the world of work are expected to be individuals who have the responsibility to manage their careers and have career adaptability skills. In this regard, it seems useful to understand the factors that may affect career adaptability. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the happiness, social support, and future time orientation can predict career adaptability of young adults. The participants consisted of 525 students (389 female and 136 male) who were enrolled at different faculties of a university in Ankara, Turkey. The instruments that were used in the study were the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale, Oxford Happiness Questionnaire–Short Form, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, Attitudes Toward the Future Scale, and a Personal Information Form prepared by the researchers. The results showed that happiness, perceived social support, positive attitude toward the future, and planned attitude toward the future were significantly positively related to career adaptability. These results indicated that individuals with a high level of happiness and positive and planned attitudes toward the future, and those who receive positive social support from their social contacts such as parents, friends, and significant others, are more career adaptive. The results were discussed in the context of the relevant literature.