The Effects of Vitamin C Administration, Acute Food Deprivation, and Acute Food Intake on Vitamin C Levels in Different Brain Areas of Guinea Pigs


KAPLAN B., Cetin F., Elbeg S.

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR VITAMIN AND NUTRITION RESEARCH, vol.80, no.3, pp.197-204, 2010 (Peer-Reviewed Journal) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 80 Issue: 3
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Doi Number: 10.1024/0300-9831/a000016
  • Journal Name: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR VITAMIN AND NUTRITION RESEARCH
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded, Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.197-204

Abstract

Vitamin C is crucial for the brain. We aimed to investigate the effects of vitamin C administration following 24 hours of acute food deprivation and 24 hours of acute food intake on changes ill vitamin C levels in different brain areas of guinea pigs. Vitamin C was administered as a single intraperitoneal dose (500 mg kg(-1) body weight) both before acute food deprivation and before acute food intake. At the end of our study, we measured the vitamin C levels in cerebral cortex lobes, brain stem structures, hypophysis, hypothalamus, cerebellum, hippocampus, and amygdala. Vitamin C levels in the frontal and parietal lobes were found to be significantly higher in animals pretreated with vitamin C prior to 24 hours of food deprivation (p < 0.05). Temporal lobe vitamin C level was significantly lower in animals that were subjected to 24 hours of acute food intake following 24 hours of food deprivation (p < 0.05). Increased vitamin C levels were observed in the occipital lobe of all animals that received vitamin C administration (p < 0.05). Vitamin C levels in the brain stem structures such as mesencephalon and pons were significantly decreased in animals pretreated with vitamin C before normal feeding (p < 0.05). Vitamin C level in the hypothalamus was significantly increased after 24 hours of food deprivation (p < 0.05). In conclusion, different areas of the brain may differ in terms of vitamin C content during nutritional changes with or without vitamin C pretreatment, such as 24 hours of food deprivation or 24 hours of food intake following 24 hours of food deprivation. These differences may be attributed to several functions of vitamin C which may occur under these circumstances.