The effect of environmental Bisphenol A exposure on breast cancer associated with obesity


ENGİN A. B. , ENGİN A.

ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY, vol.81, 2021 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 81
  • Publication Date: 2021
  • Doi Number: 10.1016/j.etap.2020.103544
  • Journal Name: ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus, Academic Search Premier, BIOSIS, CAB Abstracts, Chemical Abstracts Core, EMBASE, Environment Index, Greenfile, MEDLINE, Pollution Abstracts, Veterinary Science Database
  • Keywords: Bisphenol A, Breast cancer, Obesity, Telomerase activity, Telomere length, Estrogen-receptor-related receptors, ESTROGEN-RECEPTOR-ALPHA, GROWTH-FACTOR-I, LEUKOCYTE TELOMERE LENGTH, ACCELERATED CELLULAR SENESCENCE, BODY-MASS INDEX, G-PROTEIN, AROMATASE EXPRESSION, ADIPOSE-TISSUE, INSULIN-RESISTANCE, OXIDATIVE STRESS
  • Gazi University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely used endocrine disrupter. Its environmental exposure is a causative factor of cell aging via decreasing telomerase activity, thus leading to shortening of telomere length. Epidemiological studies confirm positive associations between BPA exposure and the incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Increased urinary BPA levels in obese females are both significantly correlated with shorter relative telomere length and T2DM. BPA is a critically effective endocrine disrupter leading to poor prognosis via the obesityinflammation-aromatase axis in breast cancer. Environmental BPA exposure contributes to the progression of both estrogen dependent and triple negative breast cancers. BPA is a positive regulator of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and it increases the expression of hTERT mRNA in breast cancer cells. BPA exposure can lead to tamoxifen resistance. Among patients treated with chemotherapy, those with persistent high telomerase activity due to BPA are at higher risk of death.