Is Age a Determinant for Nausea and Vomiting in Disabled Patients after Dental Treatment Under Sedation?


Turgut H. C. , ALKAN M. , Gulay K. I. P. , Mustafa S. A. T. A. C. , Altundag S. K. , Bozkaya S., ...More

NIGERIAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PRACTICE, vol.20, no.11, pp.1497-1500, 2017 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 20 Issue: 11
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Doi Number: 10.4103/1119-3077.222296
  • Title of Journal : NIGERIAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PRACTICE
  • Page Numbers: pp.1497-1500

Abstract

Background and Aim: Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is one of most frequently encountered problems after dental treatment of mentally and/or motor disabled patients under sedation or general anesthesia. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether PONV incidence in disabled patients differs between adults (>= 18 years) and children/teenage (<18 years). Also investigating complication rates related with anesthesia protocols were additional objectives of the study. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated anesthesia reports of 664 cases undergone different dental treatment procedures under deep sedation with various anesthetic agents. Two study groups (Group 1 consisted from patients with special needs <18 years, while Group 2 consisted from patients >= 18 years) were created. PONV incidence and other complications recorded. Results: There was no statistical difference between groups in terms of used anesthetic agent except midazolam (P < 0.017), while higher female/male ratio and longer duration of anesthesia was recorded in Group 2 (P = 0.043 and P = 0.046, respectively). We found significantly higher PONV rates in disabled patients under 18 years (P = 0.006). Hypoxia (peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO(2)) <90%) and bradycardia (heart rate <50/minute) were observed in only two patients. Conclusion: PONV is more common in disabled patients younger than 18 years and dental treatment procedures under deep sedation can be provided with acceptable complication rates in patients with special needs.