The effect of intervention on vaccination rates in children with diabetes: a controlled interventional study


DUYAN ÇAMURDAN A. , ÇAMURDAN M. O. , Beyazova U., DALGIÇ B. , BİDECİ A. , KARAKUŞ R.

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DIABETES IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES, cilt.35, sa.2, ss.76-83, 2015 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 35 Konu: 2
  • Basım Tarihi: 2015
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1007/s13410-015-0330-3
  • Dergi Adı: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DIABETES IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.76-83

Özet

Aim of this study was to investigate the vaccination status and to determine the effect of intervention (recommendation of vaccination) on vaccine coverage in diabetic patients. One hundred sxty-three diabetic children (diabetic group) and 68 children with chronic liver disease (control group) were enrolled. Seroprevalance of hepatitis B, hepatitis A, measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella infections were evaluated in diabetic group. The intervention was performed as vaccine recommendation to those in diabetic group who were determined to have missed any of the vaccinations that should have been received and who were seronegative against mentioned infections. Vaccination rates before and after the intervention in diabetic group were as follows: hepatitis B (98.8 vs 98.8 %), rubella (22.7 vs 23.9 %), hepatitis A (4.3 vs 78.5 %), measles containing vaccine (MCV) (98.6 vs 100 %), mumps (22.7 vs 37.4 %), varicella (2.5 vs 17.2 %), 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (12.2 vs 48.8 %), 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (3.7 vs 93.8 %), adult tetanus and diphtheria (Td) vaccine (first dose 96.6 vs 100.0 % and second dose 84.4 vs 100.0 %) (p < 0.05 except for hepatitis B, rubella, MCV, and first dose Td). Vaccination rates in control group to whom no intervention was performed did not change throughout the study period (p = 0.232). The considerable increase in the vaccination rates after intervention emphasizes that clinicians taking care of patients with chronic diseases should be aware of their vaccination status and should take an active role in recommending the appropriate schedule.