Different Aspects on Clinical Presentation of Developmental Venous Anomalies: Are They as Benign as Known? A Single Center Experience.


Kurt G., Aslan A., Kara E. , Erol G. , Şahin M. B. , Uçar M.

Clinical neurology and neurosurgery, vol.201, pp.106443, 2021 (Journal Indexed in SCI Expanded) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 201
  • Publication Date: 2021
  • Doi Number: 10.1016/j.clineuro.2020.106443
  • Title of Journal : Clinical neurology and neurosurgery
  • Page Numbers: pp.106443

Abstract

© 2020Background: Cerebral developmental venous anomalies (DVAs) are frequently diagnosed incidentally owing to the advances in neuroimaging. They are regarded as clinically insignificant due to their supposed quiescent existence which the authors aimed to contradict in this paper. Aim: In the aim of constituting a better understanding of clinical presentation of DVAs and making an estimation regarding the probability of resulting in a hemorrhage, the authors presented their experiences with a case series of DVAs. Methods: A retrospective analysis was carried out among patients who underwent brain MRI in a radiology department of a university between January of 2019 and January of 2020. Results: A total of 101 patients with DVA were extracted. 38 patients had isolated DVAs, while 63 patients had various accompanying cerebral pathologies, mostly cavernomas (39 patients) and AVMs (11 patients). The main complaints leading investigation were headache, dizziness, ataxia, nausea\vomiting, seizures and focal neurological deficits. 41 patients were truly symptomatic with indicative findings of seizures, neurological deficits or intracranial hemorrhages, and 12 of them had solitary DVAs. 22 patients presented with hemorrhages, and of them, 10 had only DVA, while the rest had some associated lesions, most often cavernoma. Of 22 patients with hemorrhage, 5 were operated, 5 were applied radiosurgery; while the rest were followed without any intervention. Conclusion: Although the symptoms in patients with DVA are generally charged on other associated pathologies, the fact that isolated DVAs may occasionally be problematic in the range of minor symptoms and severe hemorrhage should not be underestimated.