The Social Production of Urban Space with the Changing Ideologies A Case Study of Ankara


ULUDAĞ Z., ÇAĞLAR T. N.

IAPS 14 Conference on Evolving Environmental Ideals: Changing Ways of Life, Values and Design Practices, Stockholm, Sweden, 30 July - 03 August 1996

  • Publication Type: Conference Paper / Summary Text
  • City: Stockholm
  • Country: Sweden
  • Gazi University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

REPRESENTATION OF TRADITIONAL ARCHITECTURAL SPACES ON POPULAR IMAGINATIONS

 

Assist. Prof. Dr. Zeynep Uludag. (Architect, Ph.D)

Gazi University, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture,

Department of Architecture.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Hale Kunucen. (Communication Sciences, Ph.D)

Gazi University, Faculty of Communication Sciences.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Nur Caglar. (Architect, Ph.D)

Gazi University, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture,

Department of Architecture.

 

 

ABSTRACT

All types of narration signify a process of communication. The art of cinema, which finds its verbal and visual expression in moving images, is definitely a narration. The aim of such a narration in cinema or television is not a direct reflection of the images but reflection of a new medium with these images. The reflected reality in these images is both the reality of the object itself and also its representation (model).

 

The vision reflected on the screen is composed of several elements that create this vision. The reflection of real images via a viewing camera is an objective process and in this process the final vision can easily be far away from objectivity. Because all images taken into a camera used by humans, they become the reflection of a specific view, understanding and interpretation.  In this sense, the objective reality faces a process of interpretation.  This is the character of visions: to reflect both real images, pure reality and also to reflect an interpreted, subjective reality at the same time.

 

According to Roland Barthes, one of the most discussed concepts in semiotics is the concept of the signified, which reflects the relation of a concept with the real world and culture.  The signified has never been a copy of the real object but an abstract vision of it.  This research aims to make an evaluation of the process of interpretation and the effects of perception during the representation and visualization of architectural spaces in media.  In that sense, the visual analysis of a popular TV program in Turkey will be discussed within the conceptual framework of Barthes’ analyses that have involved a search for emptiness and the absence of meaning and the visual construction of new meanings.

 

 

The sights and sounds of the urban scene – advertising, music, cinema, television, fashion, magazines, video clips – exist in the rapid circuits of electronic production/reproduction/distribution. (Chambers, 1986:185) In the rapid interplay of these signs, the power of the languages of simulation creates “secondary meanings”, “ secondary realities” or hyper-reality, to replace the real. In this collage of sights and sounds we discover the immediate co-ordinates of the present: where existing meanings and views, ideas and opinions, are reproduced; where social practices are formed and experienced; where both consensus and rebellion is voiced; where dogma and innovation, prejudice and change, find expression. (Chambers, 1986:185). During this process a popular semiotics daily mixes together real conditions and imaginary material. The vivid languages of the cinema, television, pop music and magazines are translated into personalized styles, manners, tastes and pleasures: under given conditions, in particular situation, we take reality to pieces in order to put it back together with a further gain in meaning. The signs are inhabited, appropriated, domesticated. (Chambers, 1986:185)

 

The art of cinema is apart of the illusion industry, which is particularly rooted in capitalism. For in the face of an all-embracing, social meaning in which the individual interest of all its members would be well looked after, capitalism has nothing to offer except mere illusion. (Haug, 1986:122) Today’s postmodern society also uses this “illusion industry” to create new meanings and new commodity aesthetics to generate new “social illusions”. Social illusions of course have the power to create collective activities to take place outside the immediate ‘sphere of production’, in a very special ‘sphere of consumption’.

 

 

With special effects in films illusion industry populates the spaces emptied from their meaning and identity. 

 

This TV program “Asmali Konak” which means “Mansion with a grapevine” in English is one of the most popular TV programs in Turkey. It narrates a story at the emotional center of the “family life”. The scenario narrates the daily life a family living in Ürgüp at the center of Anatolia. It is not exactly a traditional Turkish family but also not a modern one. A historical mansion carrying significant aspects of traditional Turkish architecture is used as the film set of the story. It is a great mansion with several rooms surrounded around a courtyard, which is the heart of the house. A big family with grand parents and children and grand children are living together at different parts of this mansion. Of course there is another family living at the same mansion as a housekeeper.

 

Besides the architectural quality of the house the site has also a significant identity in terms of its geographic qualities. Ürgüp is located on the skirts of a volcanic mountain “Erciyes” in Anatolia.

 REFERENCES

Haug, Volfgang Fritz (1986). Critique of Commodity Aesthetics. Oxford: Basil Blackwell Ltd.

Chambers, Iain (1986) Popular Culture, London: Routledge.

 REPRESENTATION OF TRADITIONAL ARCHITECTURAL SPACES ON POPULAR IMAGINATIONS

 

Assist. Prof. Dr. Zeynep Uludag. (Architect, Ph.D)

Gazi University, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture,

Department of Architecture.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Hale Kunucen. (Communication Sciences, Ph.D)

Gazi University, Faculty of Communication Sciences.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Nur Caglar. (Architect, Ph.D)

Gazi University, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture,

Department of Architecture.

 

ABSTRACT

All types of narration signify a process of communication. The art of cinema, which finds its verbal and visual expression in moving images, is definitely a narration. The aim of such a narration in cinema or television is not a direct reflection of the images but reflection of a new medium with these images. The reflected reality in these images is both the reality of the object itself and also its representation (model).

 

The vision reflected on the screen is composed of several elements that create this vision. The reflection of real images via a viewing camera is an objective process and in this process the final vision can easily be far away from objectivity. Because all images taken into a camera used by humans, they become the reflection of a specific view, understanding and interpretation.  In this sense, the objective reality faces a process of interpretation.  This is the character of visions: to reflect both real images, pure reality and also to reflect an interpreted, subjective reality at the same time.

 

According to Roland Barthes, one of the most discussed concepts in semiotics is the concept of the signified, which reflects the relation of a concept with the real world and culture.  The signified has never been a copy of the real object but an abstract vision of it.  This research aims to make an evaluation of the process of interpretation and the effects of perception during the representation and visualization of architectural spaces in media.  In that sense, the visual analysis of a popular TV program in Turkey will be discussed within the conceptual framework of Barthes’ analyses that have involved a search for emptiness and the absence of meaning and the visual construction of new meanings.

 

 

The sights and sounds of the urban scene – advertising, music, cinema, television, fashion, magazines, video clips – exist in the rapid circuits of electronic production/reproduction/distribution. (Chambers, 1986:185) In the rapid interplay of these signs, the power of the languages of simulation creates “secondary meanings”, “ secondary realities” or hyper-reality, to replace the real. In this collage of sights and sounds we discover the immediate co-ordinates of the present: where existing meanings and views, ideas and opinions, are reproduced; where social practices are formed and experienced; where both consensus and rebellion is voiced; where dogma and innovation, prejudice and change, find expression. (Chambers, 1986:185). During this process a popular semiotics daily mixes together real conditions and imaginary material. The vivid languages of the cinema, television, pop music and magazines are translated into personalized styles, manners, tastes and pleasures: under given conditions, in particular situation, we take reality to pieces in order to put it back together with a further gain in meaning. The signs are inhabited, appropriated, domesticated. (Chambers, 1986:185)

 

The art of cinema is apart of the illusion industry, which is particularly rooted in capitalism. For in the face of an all-embracing, social meaning in which the individual interest of all its members would be well looked after, capitalism has nothing to offer except mere illusion. (Haug, 1986:122) Today’s postmodern society also uses this “illusion industry” to create new meanings and new commodity aesthetics to generate new “social illusions”. Social illusions of course have the power to create collective activities to take place outside the immediate ‘sphere of production’, in a very special ‘sphere of consumption’.

 With special effects in films illusion industry populates the spaces emptied from their meaning and identity. 

 

This TV program “Asmali Konak” which means “Mansion with a grapevine” in English is one of the most popular TV programs in Turkey. It narrates a story at the emotional center of the “family life”. The scenario narrates the daily life a family living in Ürgüp at the center of Anatolia. It is not exactly a traditional Turkish family but also not a modern one. A historical mansion carrying significant aspects of traditional Turkish architecture is used as the film set of the story. It is a great mansion with several rooms surrounded around a courtyard, which is the heart of the house. A big family with grand parents and children and grand children are living together at different parts of this mansion. Of course there is another family living at the same mansion as a housekeeper.

 

Besides the architectural quality of the house the site has also a significant identity in terms of its geographic qualities. Ürgüp is located on the skirts of a volcanic mountain “Erciyes” in Anatolia.

 

 

 

 

REFERENCES

Haug, Volfgang Fritz (1986). Critique of Commodity Aesthetics. Oxford: Basil Blackwell Ltd.

Chambers, Iain (1986) Popular Culture, London: Routledge.