Preservice mathematics teachers' TPACK development when they are teaching polygons with geogebra


KARTAL B., ÇİNAR C.

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MATHEMATICAL EDUCATION IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, vol.55, no.5, pp.1171-1203, 2024 (ESCI) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 55 Issue: 5
  • Publication Date: 2024
  • Doi Number: 10.1080/0020739x.2022.2052197
  • Journal Name: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MATHEMATICAL EDUCATION IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
  • Journal Indexes: Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI), Scopus, Academic Search Premier, IBZ Online, Applied Science & Technology Source, Computer & Applied Sciences, EBSCO Education Source, Education Abstracts, Educational research abstracts (ERA), ERIC (Education Resources Information Center), zbMATH, DIALNET
  • Page Numbers: pp.1171-1203
  • Keywords: Technological pedagogical content knowledge, preservice mathematics teachers, microteaching lesson study, TPACK, GeoGebra, PEDAGOGICAL CONTENT KNOWLEDGE, TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION, EDUCATION, SCIENCE, INSTRUMENT, CLASSROOMS, FRAMEWORK, BELIEFS, MODEL
  • Gazi University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) is defined as the teacher knowledge needed for effective technology integration. This study aimed to investigate preservice elementary mathematics teachers' TPACK development. TPACK survey was administered to 33 preservice teachers (PSTs), and six of them were selected via maximum variation sampling to represent as different cases as possible based on their mathematical knowledge and technological self-assessment. These six PSTs implemented four technology-based lessons (two microteaching sessions in the mathematics teaching method course and two lessons in the student teaching). Participants' TPACK levels were examined based on the development model proposed by Niess, M. L., Sadri, P., & Lee, K. (2007, April). Dynamic spreadsheets as learning technology tools: Developing teachers' technology pedagogical content knowledge (TPCK). Paper presented at the meeting of the American Educational Research Association Annual Conference, Chicago, IL. Results showed that participants had not used technology effectively and efficiently in their microteaching sessions and the first lessons in their student teaching. After evaluating their first lessons in schools, PSTs improved their teaching considerably. We suggest giving more opportunities for PSTs to teach with technology in classrooms and to assess their teaching practices reflectively.