Gender (in)difference in private offices: A holistic approach for assessing satisfaction and personalization


Dinc P.

Journal of Environmental Psychology, vol.29, no.1, pp.53-62, 2009 (Journal Indexed in SCI Expanded) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 29 Issue: 1
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Doi Number: 10.1016/j.jenvp.2008.10.006
  • Title of Journal : Journal of Environmental Psychology
  • Page Numbers: pp.53-62
  • Keywords: Gender, Personalization, Office, Assessment, Employee satisfaction, DESIGN, WORK, COMMUNICATION, ENVIRONMENT, PREDICTORS, PERCEPTION, WORKPLACE, BUILDINGS, ENCLOSURE, EMPLOYEE

Abstract

This research is a combination of gender studies, which highlights differences between men and women, and workplace research, which focuses on the performances that are assumed to affect employee satisfaction. The study proposes a multi-dimensional assessment model that enables consideration of several workplace issues in tandem. Focusing on user satisfaction, the first part of the study is a holistic approach concerned with technical, functional and behavioral variables that provides a broad understanding about gender (in)differences. Personalization, the core issue of the second part of the study, is measured through personal display items, autonomous behavior and office layout preferences of men and women employees. The findings indicate the presence of significant gender differences in terms of satisfaction felt with regard to the behavioral variables. The results also support previous findings indicating that men and women use different personal display items in order to personalize their offices. More women were diagnosed to be changing their room layout on a temporary basis whereas men and women were evidenced for having similar attitudes in making permanent changes and in preferring an office layout for themselves. The findings suggest that gender difference is still a valid subject in workplace research although the differences may not be as sharp as the conventional gender difference myth claims, implying a better understanding of the issues that differently satisfy men and women. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.